Phytochemical screening, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Chrysopogon zizanioides essential oil

Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Roberty, Poaceae, is a plant widely used in northeast Brazil in folk medicine for the treatment of various pathological conditions, including inflammatory pain. The present study evaluated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of C. zizanioides essential oil...

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Access type:openAccess
Publication Date:2012
Main Author: Lima, Gabrielle Mendes
Other Authors: Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José, Thomazzi, Sara Maria, Almeida, Emyle Mayra Santana Alves, Melo, Mônica Santos de, Serafini, Mairim Russo, Cavalcanti, Sócrates Cabral de Holanda, Gelain, Daniel Pens, Santos, João Paulo Almeida dos, Blank, Arie Fitzgerald, Alves, Péricles Barreto, Oliveira Neta, Paulina Marques de, Lima, Julianeli Tolentino de, Rocha, Ricardo Fagundes da, Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca, Araújo, Adriano Antunes de Souza
Document type: Article
Language:eng
Portuguese subjects:
Online Access:https://ri.ufs.br/handle/riufs/614
Citation:LIMA, G. M. et al. Phytochemical screening, antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities of Chrysopogon zizanioides essential oil. Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia, Curitiba, v. 22, n. 2, Abr. 2012. Disponível em: <http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-695X2012000200027&lng=en&nrm=iso>. Acesso em: 11 jun. 2013.
Portuguese abstract:Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Roberty, Poaceae, is a plant widely used in northeast Brazil in folk medicine for the treatment of various pathological conditions, including inflammatory pain. The present study evaluated the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of C. zizanioides essential oil (EO) in rodents. EO was further characterized by GC/MS. The major components of EO were identified as khusimol (19.57%), E-isovalencenol (13.24%), α-vetivone (5.25%), β-vetivone (4.87%) and hydroxy-valencene (4.64%). Following intraperitoneal injection (i.p.), EO at 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the number of writhes (51.9 and 64.9%, respectively) and the number of paw licks during phase 2 (56.7 and 86.2%, respectively) of a formalin model when compared to control group animals. However, EO-treated mice were ineffective at all doses in hot-plate and rota-rod tests. The EO inhibited the carrageenan-induced leukocyte migration to the peritoneal cavity in a dose-dependent manner (34.7, 35.4, and 62.5% at doses of 25, 50 and 100 mg/kg, respectively). In the paw edema test, the EO (100 mg/kg) inhibited all three phases of the edema equally well, suggesting that the EO has a non-selective inhibitory effect on the release or actions of these mediators. Our results suggest possible antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects of the EO.